Farm: 291 Fletcher St Dunstable MA

Store: 446 Pleasant St Dunstable MA

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© 2017 by Tully Farms Dairy

Our Story

In 1872, Henry and Mary Tully purchased a farm on Hollis Street. In 1901, Charles E Tully, the son of Henry and Mary, purchased the Drake property, located further up on Hollis St. The Drake property consisted of 40 acres of land. The Tully family continued to add land and expand the farm over time. In 1919, Charles E. bought the Rideout Farm on Fletcher St. The farm consisted of 200 acres of land. In 1940, Charles and his son George purchased the Lawrence Farm, which is located in Pepperell, MA and Hollis, NH, adding another 120 acres to the farm. 

George, his son Charles W., and his brother Eugene formed Tully Farms Inc. in 1970. George's grandson Charles W. Jr. joined the corporation after high school and is currently the president. The Tully Farm has undergone many changes throughout the years, including new barns and technology, and the family plans to continue their dedication to quality farming for many years to come. 

Our Family
George Tully 

George was largely responsible for the growth and success of Tully Farm. ​George Tully lived on Tully Farm in the house on the Drake property from when he was born until he passed away in May 2015. George loved his family, his farm, and his town. George and his wife June raised 7 children, 22 grandchildren, 53 great-grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Grampa taught the family a lot about love, life and community. Everyone is family and he wanted the best for his community.  Less than two days before he passed away, Grampa was plowing the cornfields so that they were ready for spring planting. 

George served his town in many ways, including many years as selectman. In 1974, George co-founded the Dunstable Civic Trust, the predecessor of the Dunstable Rural Land Trust.  He was instrumental in the formation of the Farmer's Live Animal Market Exchange (FLAME) in Littleton, MA in 1967. George was also active in the Grange and the Middlesex County Farm Bureau. He received the John Ogonowski Award for Leadership and Dedication. We know Grampa would be proud of the continued growth of the farm and this new adventure into selling our own milk. 

Charles W Tully Sr. 

At an early age, Charlie began working on the family farm. He worked before and after school every day, milking cows, picking potatoes and strawberries, and tending to other farm animals. After graduating high school, Charlie assumed responsibility, alongside his father, for daily operations of the farm.

He was a 60-Year Member of Dunstable Grange #31 and was active with the Middlesex County Farm Bureau for many years. Charlie devoted his life to Tully Farm and his family, most of whom live in Dunstable and stop by the farm regularly to work or visit.

 

Charlie lived on the farm with his wife Ruth. Ruth still makes breakfast and farm time (coffee break in the afternoon) for her family members who work on the farm. 
 

Charles W Tully Jr.

Charlie Jr started working on the family farm at a young age, working before and after school. After graduating high school and the University of New Hampshire, Charlie joined his father and grandfather in the family business. Charlie is the president of Middlesex County Farm Bureau and the Dunstable Grange. He is actively involved in many organizations working to improve our communities. 

Charlie Jr has continued the growth started by George. He has seen the farm through new construction and new technology. Charlie is excited to start home delivery and selling our farm fresh milk to our neighbors. 

And the rest of the Tully Family

Family is important to us and we are fortunate to have one of the best. Without the support of our family and friends, the farm would not be where it is today.

Charlie receives a lot of support from his wife Jennifer and children. Kristina, Erin and Steven help out when possible and love to spend time on the farm. The youngest, Jacob, will be the sixth generation of Tully's to work on the farm for a living. 

Many cousins, aunts, uncles and nieces and nephews help out at the farm whenever needed, whether it is milking cows, driving tractors, or getting bottles ready for milk. George's sister Ruthie and her husband stop by to support the farm as much as possible. Even the friends who help out, daily or when needed, have become part of the family.